Around the Virtual World

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A weekly wrap up of interesting news about virtual worlds, virtual goods and other social media.

Virtual Justice

Rutgers University law professor Greg Lastowka looks at whether players can and should be granted legal ownership of virtual items, whether or not there’s any existing legal precedent and how the virtual item landscape may change in the near future.

Italian court: Online editors not responsible for reader comments

Online commentators Wednesday welcomed a ruling by Italy’s highest court that the editors of online publications cannot be held legally responsible for defamatory comments posted by their readers. In a ruling handed down at the end of October, the Court of Cassation acquitted a former online editor of L’Espresso news magazine of the crime of failing to prevent defamation committed by one of her readers.

OUII Seeks Clarity On ‘Process Of Establishment’ Claims

The U.S.
International Trade Commission

should review a recent finding in a video game patent infringement case and clarify how to determine if a domestic industry is in the process of being established in Section 337 cases, the ITC’s Office of Unfair Import Investigations said in a petition publicized Tuesday.

Germany’s Merck wants Facebook page back

Germany’s Merck KGaA has threatened legal action after it said it lost its Facebook page apparently to rival Merck & Co. in the U.S., though it has yet to identify defendants in the case.

Virtual World Startups Seek Refuge From Patent Attacks

The developers behind the next evolution of the Internet — linked,
immersive, 3D environments — are trying to think of ways to minimize the adverse impact of software patents on their industry.

Social media in for worse cyber attacks in 2012

Social media sites and cellphones will prove to be fertile grounds for cyber criminals to exploit globally important events in 2012 to steal personal information and data and make financial gains, cyber security firm Websense has said. The Websense document, ” 2012 Cyber Security Threats,” has said identity information posted by users of sites such as Facebook, Twitter or LinkedIn may prove more valuable to cybercriminals than even credit cards.